The sixth edition of the book 'Discrete Mathematics and Structures' is an outcome of author's continuous discussions with his colleagues and students. Unlike other books, this book helps the readers to develop mathematical maturity and understand the basic concepts of Discrete Mathematics and Structures. Extensive in its coverage, each new concept is gently introduced and then reinforced by a lot of solved examples. Questions from various examinations have been incorporated to enable the students to understand the latest trends in paper-setting.
Additional Info
  • Publisher: Laxmi Publications
  • Language: English
  • ISBN : 978-81-318-0452-0
  • Chapter 1

    Sets Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    A set is defined as a collection of distinct objects of same type or class of objects. The objects of a set are called elements or members of the set. Objects can be numbers, alphabets, names etc.
  • Chapter 2

    Principle of Inclusion and Exclusion Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    As we know the cardinality of the set P is the number of unique elements in set P. It is denoted as | P | and read as cardinality of set P.
  • Chapter 3

    Mathematical Induction Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The process to establish the validity of a general result involving natural numbers is the principle of mathematical induction.
  • Chapter 4

    Relations Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Relations
  • Chapter 5

    Functions Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    function f from a set P into a set Q is a relation from P to Q such that each element of P is related to exactly one element of the set Q
  • Chapter 6

    Algorithms Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    An algorithm is a step-by-step method of solving some problem.
  • Chapter 7

    Graphs Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The graphs consist of points or nodes called vertices which are connected to each other by way of lines called edges. These lines may be directed or undirected.
  • Chapter 8

    Trees Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    A graph which has no cycle is called an acyclic graph. A tree is an acyclic graph or graph having no cycles. A tree or general tree is defined as a non-empty finite set of elements called vertices or nodes having the property that each node can have minimum degree 1 and maximum degree n .
  • Chapter 9

    Propositional Calculus Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    A proposition is a statement which is either true or false. It is a declarative sentence
  • Chapter 10

    Probability Theory Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The word ‘probability’ means the chance of occurring of a certain event. It is generally possible to predict the future of an event quantitatively with a certain probability of being correct. The probability is used in such cases where the outcome of trial is uncertain.
  • Chapter 11

    Counting Techniques Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Counting Techniques
  • Chapter 12

    Sequences and Series Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    A sequence is defined as a set of numbers which are written in some particular order
  • Chapter 13

    Recurrence Relations and Generating Functions Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Recurrence Relations and Generating Functions
  • Chapter 14

    Algebraic Structures Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    If there exists a system such that it consists of a non-empty set and one or more opera- tions on that, set, then that system is called an algebraic system.
  • Chapter 15

    Posets and Lattices Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Posets and Lattices
  • Chapter 16

    Boolean Algebra Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Boolean Algebra
  • Chapter 17

    Finite Automata and Languages Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The term ‘finite automata’ describes a class of models of computation that are characterised by having a finite number of states. Finite automata are computing devices that accept/recognize regular languages and are used to model operations of many systems we find in practice. Their operations can be simulated by a very simple computer program. The automata might initially not seem very useful since their response to an input is to output either a ‘yes’ or a ‘no’. They have applications in modelling hardware, building compilers, program verification, and so on.

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