I am highly delighted to place in the hands of my esteemed readers the text of “FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER PROGRAMMING AND IT” in its revised form. This book is written for Engineering, M.Tech., M.C.A., M.Sc. (Computer Science), B.C.A., B.I.T., B.Sc., P.G.D.C.A. and other diploma course students. PART A of the book presents Fundamentals of Computer and IT in a simple and easy to understand style. The subject matter thoroughly clears the doubts (if any) of both a novice or an experienced computer user. PART B of this book covers Basics of Programming Using C++. It presents all the C++ programming topics from elementary to basics of file handling with properly tested programming examples. I have put my sincere efforts and knowledge to make you understand the subject matter in simplest and easiest form. Valuable suggestions are always most welcome. WISH YOU A GRAND SUCCESS in your examination, and a very bright future in the field of Computer Science.
Additional Info
  • Publisher: Laxmi Publications
  • Language: English
  • ISBN : 978-81-318-0701-9
  • Chapter 1

    Introduction To Computers Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Computer is perhaps the most powerful and versatile tool ever created by human being. In today’s world, the use of computers has increased so rapidly that we can no longer ignore them. Computers influence our lives in one way or the other. These days we see computers being used to perform several functions that have made our life easy. The list of services for which computers are used is a long one.
  • Chapter 2

    Working Knowledge Of Computer System Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    We know that a computer system consists of hardware and software. Software, or programs, are instructions that tell the computer how to perform a task. System software enables the application software to interact with the computer and helps the computer manage its internal and external resources. Applications software is software that has been developed to solve a particular problem for users. In this chapter, we will discuss about operating system and GUI based operating system Windows XP. A brief introduction to application software packages, MS-Word, PowerPoint, MS-Excel will be provided. The Internet is a worldwide computer network that connects hundreds of thousands of smaller networks. The evolution of Internet and its applications and services will also be covered
  • Chapter 3

    Problem Solving & Program Planning Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    3.1 Need for Problem Solving and Planning a Program A program is a sequence of instructions written in a programming language. There are various programming languages, each having its own advantages for program development. Generally every program takes an input, manipulates it and provides an output as shownin Figure 3.1
  • Chapter 4

    Overview Of C++ Language Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    4.1 Introduction to C++ Language Object Oriented Programming (OOP) is a way of organizing programs. C++ is an object- oriented programming language. It was developed by Bjarne Stroustrup in 1983 at the AT&T Bell Laboratories, New Jersey, USA. He found ‘C’ lacking for simulations and decided to extend the language by using additional features from his favourite language, Simula 67 . Simula 67 was one of the earliest object-oriented languages. Bjarne Stroustrup called it “C with Classes” originally. Strictly speaking, C++ is a superset of C: Almost every correct statement in C is also a correct statement in C++, although the reverse is not true. The name C++ (C plus plus) was given by Rick Mascitti where “++” is the C increment operator. The version 1.0 became available commercially in 1985, version 2 in 1989 and versions 3 in 1992. C++ evolved to cope with problems encountered by users, and through discussions at AT&T. In fact, the maturation of the C++ language was attested to by the two events given below:
  • Chapter 5

    Operators And Expressions Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    5.1 Operators The C++ language provides a number of operators. These operators are used in different combinations to form expressions. For example, the symbol ‘–’ is a subtract operator that subtracts two data items called operands. An operator can be defined as a symbol that specifies an operation to be performed. The data items on which the operators act upon are called operands. Some operators require a single operand while others might require two operands to act upon. The order in which the operations are performed by the operators is known as the order of precedence. Let us get ourselves familiar with these different categories of operators available in C++ language.
  • Chapter 6

    Beginning With C++ Program Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    6.1 Introduction All the input and output operations are supported by the istream (input stream) and ostream (output stream) classes. The identifier cout (pronounced “see-out”) is a predefined object in C++ that corresponds to the standard output stream (A stream is simply a sequence of bytes). The identifier cin (pronounced “see-in”) is a predefined object in C++ that corresponds to the standard input stream. In this chapter, we will discuss about input/output using extraction (>>) and insertion (<<) operators and write simple C++ programs.
  • Chapter 7

    Control Structures Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    7.1 Introduction Every C++ program must have at least one function called main( ). When you run a C++ program, the first statement executed will be at the beginning of function main( ) and the last statement at the end of function main( ). Therefore, the main( ) function is also known as driver function as it drives the program. If there is no function called main( ) in your program, the linker will signal an error. In most C++ programs, as we will see later, main( ) calls other functions. The parentheses following the word main are the distinguishing feature of a function. Without the parentheses the compiler would treat main as a variable or some other program element.
  • Chapter 8

    Control Structures Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    7.1 Introduction Every C++ program must have at least one function called main( ). When you run a C++ program, the first statement executed will be at the beginning of function main( ) and the last statement at the end of function main( ). Therefore, the main( ) function is also known as driver function as it drives the program. If there is no function called main( ) in your program, the linker will signal an error. In most C++ programs, as we will see later, main( ) calls other functions. The parentheses following the word main are the distinguishing feature of a function. Without the parentheses the compiler would treat main as a variable or some other program element.
  • Chapter 9

    Functions Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    A function groups a number of program statements into a single unit and gives it a name. This unit can be called (invoked) from other parts of the program. Functions are the building blocks of C++ programs where all the program activity occurs. All C++ compilers come with a standard library functions that perform most commonly needed tasks. Turbo C++ has a set of functions. More about library functions later on. Let us learn to code functions as per our need i.e., User Defined Functions Figure 8.1 shows an outline of using the user defined functions.
  • Chapter 10

    Arrays And Strings Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    9.1 Introduction So far we have used C++ basic data types. C++ provides the derived data types also, which are built from the basic integer and floating data types. An array is a C++ derived type that can store several values of one type. An array is a collection of homogeneous (same type) elements that are referred by a common name. It is also called a subscripted variable as the array elements are used by the name of an array and an index or subscript. In C++, all arrays consist of contiguous memory locations . The lowest address corresponds to the first element and the highest address to the last element. Arrays can store data items of simple types like int or float or even of user-defined types like structures and objects.
  • Chapter 11

    Concepts Of Object Oriented Programming Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    10.1 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) was developed because limitations were discovered in earlier approaches to programming. A recent trend in programming methodology is OOP where the real world is represented by objects. An object is a combination of data structures and procedures that operate upon or extract information from these data structures. Imagine you are programming in a traditional third-generation language, such as BASIC, creating your coded instructions one line at a time. As you work on some segment of the program (such as how to compute overtime pay), you may think, “I will bet some other programmer has already written something like this. Wish I had it. It would save a lot of time”. Fortunately, a kind of recycling technique now exists. This is object-oriented programming
  • Chapter 12

    Classes And Objects Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Implementation of Object Oriented Programming Concepts in C++ “C with classes” was the original name given by the originator, Stroustrup initially, which nowadays is popularly known as C++. Classes and objects are the most important features of C++. The class implements OOP features and ties them together. A structure groups different type of elements and a function organizes the program actions to perform the desired task.
  • Chapter 13

    Basics Of File Handling Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The first electronic computers were used for calculations in scientific applications. The volume of data in these applications was very small and the number of computations were very large in number. Later on, it was realized that computer could be useful for business applications such as payroll, banking, railway and airline reservation, inventory control, design work etc. where the volume of data is very large in comparison to scientific applications. The program and data must be brought into main memory before processing takes place. The computer memory being limited so the entire data may not even fit into main memory. Even if, it fits into memory, the entire data is not processed at a time. Generally, only a small amount of data is processed at a time, so why to keep the main memory occupied with unnecessary data. The unused memory space can be utilized by other programs or data. The above mentioned problems required the use of files.

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