An important mission of the World Congress in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Applied Computing (a federated congress to which this conference is affiliated with) includes "Providing a unique platform for a diverse community of constituents composed of scholars, researchers, developers, educators, and practitioners. The Congress makes concerted effort to reach out to participants affiliated with diverse entities (such as: universities, institutions, corporations, government agencies, and research centers/labs) from all over the world. The congress also attempts to connect participants from institutions that have teaching as their main mission with those who are affiliated with institutions that have research as their main mission. The congress uses a quota system to achieve its institution and geography diversity objectives." By any definition of diversity, this congress is among the most diverse scientific meeting in USA. We are proud to report that this federated congress has authors and participants from 82 different nations representing variety of personal and scientific experiences that arise from differences in culture and values. As can be seen (see below), the program committee of this conference as well as the program committee of all other tracks of the federated congress are as diverse as its authors and participants.
Additional Info
  • Publisher: Laxmi Publications
  • Language: English
  • ISBN : 978-93-84872-07-6
  • Chapter 1

    Stencil and Lattice Structures for Field Equation Model Simulations on GPUs Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Field equations can be numerically simulated by approximating a continuous space field by a discrete lattice. There are a number of different lattice geometries that can be used to approximate continuous space which may cause structural artefacts in the simulation. These different lattice structures require the use of different stencil operators to approximate the spatial terms of the field equations. We show how different lattice geometries and associated stencil operators can be implemented in a stencil library which is used in conjunction with a code generator to produce code for field equations simulations that can run on a CPU or GPU.

  • Chapter 2

    The Complexity and Algorithm for k-Duplicates Combinatorial Auctions with Submodular and Subadditive Bidders Price 2.00  |  2 Rewards Points

    In this paper, we study the problem of maximizing welfare in combinatorial auctions with k(> 1)- duplicates of each item, where k is a fixed constant (i.e. k is not the part of the input) and bidders are submodular or subadditive. We exhibit some upper and lower approximation bounds for k-duplicates combinatorial auctions. First, we show that it is NP-hard to approximate the maximum welfare for k-duplicates combinatorial auctions with subadditive bidders within a factor of 2−_ where _ > 0 unless P = NP. Secondly, we propose a 2-approximation algorithm for kduplicates combinatorial auctions with submodular bidders

  • Chapter 3

    Optimising Computations for Evaluating Ising and Potts Model Partition Functions by Exact Enumeration Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The Ising and Potts discrete lattice are useful baselines of comparison for many systems and theoretical calculations in statistical physics. While these models are traditionally studied using Monte Carlo sampling techniques it is also useful to exactly enumerate their partition functions using bruteforce coding techniques. Recent advances in bitwise manipulation and parallel processing technology have made these techniques computationally feasible for the Q=3,4 state Potts model as well as the 2 state Ising spin model. We report on bit-packing and graphical processing unit implementations to improve the number of model states that can be exactly enumerated per second and discuss implications for uses of this approach with various observables.

  • Chapter 4

    A Functional Approach to Finding Answer Sets Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    A naive answer set solver was implemented in the functional programming language SequenceL, and its performance compared to mainstream solvers on a set of standard benchmark problems. Implementation was very rapid (25 person hours) and the resulting program only 400 lines of code. Nonetheless, the algorithm was tractable and obtained parallel speedups. Performance, though not pathologically poor, was considerably slower (around 20x) than that of mainstream solvers (CLASP, Smodels, and DLV) on all but one benchmark problem.

  • Chapter 5

    Lag-based Load Balancing for Linux-based Multiprocessor Systems Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In this paper, we present a lag-based load balancing approach to achieve global fairness with the Linux CFS (Completely Fair Scheduler). Lag of each task is defined as the ideal CPU time it should have received minus the actual CPU time it has received. The proposed approach monitors the lag of each task at runtime and moves tasks to underloaded processors so that each task can bound its lag. We implemented the proposed approach in the Linux kernel and experimentally evaluated it. The results demonstrate that our algorithm shows significant fairness improvements.

  • Chapter 6

    Generating edge covers of path graphs Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    It is known that the edge cover problem is #P complete. Even for path graphs with m edges it has been shown that the set of edge covers is equal to fibonnaci(m). As a consequence, generating the set of edge covers of a given path graph is an exponential combinatorial problem. In this paper we show that the set of edge covers of a given path graph can be generated by what we call a set of kernel strings. Even more, we show that both the set of kernel strings is bounded by a quadratic polynomial and also there is a quadratic polynomial algorithm which generates kernel strings. As a consequence, a particular edge cover can be recovered from a kernel string in polynomial time

  • Chapter 7

    Finding Paths with Minimum Shared Edges in Graphs with Bounded Treewidth Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Given a positive integer p, a graph G and a pair of two terminals s and t in G, the minimum shared edge paths problem is to find p paths connecting s and t so as to minimize the number of edges shared among the paths. This is a generalization of the well-known edge disjoint paths problem which asks whether there exist p pair wise edge-disjoint paths connecting the terminals. The edge-disjoint paths problem is NP-complete for given many pairs of terminals even for graphs with tree width at most two. In this paper we show that the minimum shared-edge paths problem for a given pair of two terminals can be solved in polynomial time for graphs with bounded tree width.

  • Chapter 8

    Labeling for Vertices in Strict 2-Threshold Graphs Price 2.90  |  2.9 Rewards Points

    In this paper, we show a labeling scheme for a class of graphs named Strict 2-Threshold that have threshold dimension 2. The labeling scheme characterizes the structural properties of neighborhood of each vertex. As a consequence, variation of a known recognition algorithm by Rossella Petreschi and Andrea Sterbini published in 1995 is presented, where n is the number of nodes, and m is the number of edges in the graph.

  • Chapter 9

    Weak Convex Restrained Dominating Critical Graphs Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In a graph G = (V, E), a set D V is a weak convex set if d<D>(u, v) = dG(u, v) for any two vertices u, v in D. A weak convex set D is called as a weak convex dominating (WCD) set if each vertex of V-D is adjacent to at least one vertex in D. A weak convex dominating set D is called weak convex restrained dominating (WCRD) set if every vertex in V(G)-D is adjacent to a vertex in D and another vertex in V(G)-D.

  • Chapter 10

    Formalization Description of Huffman Coding Trees Using Mizar Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Mizar is a type of system known as a "proof checker," which automatically inspects the validity of formal mathematical proofs. Mizar, designed for computational descriptions of mathematics, was developed by Professor A. Trybulec et al. at the University of Bialystok, in Poland [1]. Various theorems can be formulated using the Mizar programming language, and their validity is automatically checked by Mizar’s proof checker. The Mizar system contains a library known as the Mizar Mathematical Library, a repository of many formally described theorems and definitions whose validity has been already inspected, from which various applications can be sourced. In this report, we examine the future direction of formal definitions of source coding using Mizar, and as a specific example, we report on the formal description of Huffman coding

  • Chapter 11

    Extended Timed Alternating Finite Automata: Revisited Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In this paper, we continue to investigate timed alternating finite automata (TAFA), in particular we generalize the existing theory to the case of extended timed alternating finite automata (ETAFA). We define a framework extension of TAFA, study their power and properties. We develop an algebraic treatment of such ETAFA, along the lines of the algebraic treatment of systems of equations based on timed alternating finite automata. We present an equational language representation for ETAFA which parallels that of languages equations for TAFA. The power of these machines is discussed, as well as some of their fundamental properties. Moreover, we consider timed _- transitions and clock precisions, and discuss their interpretations in ETAFA.

  • Chapter 12

    Formalization of Binary Fields and N-dimensional Binary Vector Spaces Using the Mizar Proof Checker Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Binary fields and n-dimensional binary vector spaces play important roles in practical computer science, for example, coding theory and cryptology. In this paper, we introduce our formalization of binary fields and n- dimensional binary vector spaces. We then prove some theorems about subspaces and bases of n-dimensional binary vector spaces. We prove the correctness of our formalization using the Mizar proof checking system as a formal verification tool. Mizar is a project that formalizes mathematics with a computer-aided proving technique and is a universally accepted proof checking system. The main objective of this study is to prove the security of cryptographic systems using the Mizar proof checker.

  • Chapter 13

    On the Expressiveness of Monadic Higher Order Safe Ambient Calculus Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In this paper, we propose a monadic higher order safe ambient calculus. The expressiveness of this calculus is studied. We showed that polyadic higher order safe ambient calculus, first order safe ambient calculus with capability-passing, first order safe ambient calculus with name-passing, and polyadic _-calculus can all be encoded in monadic higher order ambient calculus. At last, we show that synchronous monadic higher order ambient calculus can be encoded in asynchronous monadic higher order ambient calculus.

  • Chapter 14

    Test Case Generation and Execution based on Record- Replayer Mechanism Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In this paper, we present a novel testing approach using deterministic replay. Deterministic replay is a technology that records nondeterministic events during a normal computer execution and deterministically replays the computer system’s execution along with the recorded events. We apply this deterministic replay technology to event-driven embedded system testing. The proposed approach works in three steps. First, we run an initial test using a sequence of “essential’’ events and obtain an event history that contains enough information needed for deterministic replay. Second, we create a number of variants of event history, i.e., test cases, by mutating the event history and/or adding more event records into the event history. Third, we execute the variants of event history emulating all recorded I/O events. This approach has two important advantages. It allows us to easily and efficiently generate a lot of effective test cases that can exhibit subtle bugs like races. It also provides an efficient means for automated test case execution since we do not need any arrangement of external entities like users and other systems.

  • Chapter 15

    Normal Bisimulation for Higher Order -Calculus with Passivation Revisited Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In this paper, we present late context bisimulation and normal bisimulation for higher order _-calculus with passivation and prove the coincidence between nor- mal bisimulation, late context bisimulation, early context bisimulation and contextual barbed bisimulation for higher order _-calculus with passivation. Furthermore, we give a variant of normal bisimulation, called limited normal bisimulation, and prove the equivalence between limited normal bisimulation and other bisimulations. At last, we extend the definitions and propositions for weak bisimulations of HO_P to the case of strong bisimulations.

  • Chapter 16

    Bit Level Encryption Standard (BLES): Version-III Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In the present paper the authors have introduced a new symmetric key cryptographic method called Bit Level Encryption Standard (BLES) Version-III which is based on bit level columnar transposition method, bit-wise generalized vernam cipher method with feedback and bit-wise XOR operation. Recently Nath et al has developed BLES Version-I where they have used bit exchange method but with some fixed block size which were multiple of 2. Due to even power of two sometimes there were some repeats of characters in the encrypted file if the input plain text has also duplicate characters. To eliminate that problem Nath et al developed BLES Version–II where the authors have taken block size of square of odd numbers starting from three onwards. For scanning from right to left the authors used square of even numbers starting from four onwards. After finishing bit exchange the authors have performed bit-wise XOR to make the cryptosystem almost unbreakable. In the present work the authors changed the bit level encryption method by using bit level columnar transposition method in random order followed by bit level generalized vernam cipher method and bit level XOR operation. To make the encryption process strong the authors have reverse the entire content of the file and applied the he same encryption method. BLES version III is done pure bit level also the authors have used the feedback which gives extra strength to this method. The present method will be most suitable for encrypting short message, password, confidential key etc. The spectral analysis in the result sections shows that the BLES version-III method is free from known plain text attack, differential attack or any type brute force attack.

  • Chapter 17

    Energy Efficient Multi Level Authentication in Sensor Network Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Sensor networks are deployed for various monitoring applications. The sensed data is reported to base station in multi hop fashion. The reporting should be in secure manner so that the adversary can’t forge the data and can be prevented from any masquerade attack. Public key schemes are best suited for one-way authentication as compare to symmetric one, but consume more energy at sensor on applying them.

  • Chapter 18

    Energy Efficient Encryption using Counter mode of operation in Wireless Sensor Network Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    Sensor networks are deployed for various monitoring applications. The reporting should be in secure manner so that the adversary can’t forge the data and can be prevented from any disclosure. In this paper we have identified those calculations which are not necessary to be performed on sensor node for securing the network, shifted to base stations to save the energy at nodes. Using pre-processing approach saves energy consumption at nodes for producing Secured/ Encrypted data. So here we are proposing EEECMO method Energy Efficient Encryption using Counter mode of operation in such a way that before the deployment, the base station process the part of the security algorithm that involve the key in the setup phase. In this fashion, we are getting secure communication network without the distribution of the key among the sensor nodes and also minimizes energy consumption at sensor node.

  • Chapter 19

    Advanced Symmetric Key Cryptosystem using Bit and Byte Level Encryption Methods with Feedback Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In the present paper the authors have introduced a new symmetric key cryptographic method where the authors have applied bit level and byte level generalized modified vernam cipher method followed by bit-wise transposition method. Nath et al already developed method which was a combination of generalized bit level and byte level encryption methods. In the present method the authors have added one more encryption method that is bitwise columnar transposition method. Nath et al also developed bit level encryption standard(BLES) Ver-I and Ver-II where they have used extensive bit level permutation, bit exchange, bit xor and bit shift encryption method. In the present study the authors have used both bit level generalized vernam cipher method and after that byte level vernam cipher method using feedback and finally the output is passed through bit-wise columnar transposition method to make the whole system more secured. The introduction of feedback in both bit level as well as byte level vernam cipher method prevents from standard attacks such as differential attack or known plain text attack. In the present paper the authors have used random key generator to construct the keypad for vernam cipher method. The present method will be most effective for encrypting short message, password, any confidential key etc.

  • Chapter 20

    Modern Encryption Standard (MES) : Version-III Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    In the present paper the authors have introduced a new symmetric key cryptographic method called Modern encryption Standard (MES) Version-III. Sircar et. al already published Modern Encryption Standard version- II(MES-II) where the authors have used used Modified generalized vernam cipher method with feedback with different block size from left to right and after that entire content is divided into two files and then combine them by taking 2nd half first and the 1st block. The generalised modified Vernam Cipher method again applied from left to right with different block sizes. In the present method i.e in MES-III the authors have combined three encryption methods one after another. Firstly in method-1 the authors have used blockwise generalized vernam cipher method. Secondly in method-2 the input file is the encrypted file obtained after method-1. In method-2 the authors have applied the permutation method to reshuffle the entire file. Thirdly in method-3 the authors have applied bit-wise vernam cipher method. In method-3 the input file will be the second encrypted file obtained after method-2.In result section the authors have shown the results obtained after method-1,method-2,method-3. The result shows the encryption method is free from common attacks such as any kind of brute force method or known plain text method. The entire software is developed in Matlab. The authors have applied MES-III on various types of files and found that it works successfully. It is almost impossible to break the present method without knowing the exact key and all three methods. MES-III will be applicable to encrypt password, any confidential key, bank data, defense data etc.

  • Chapter 21

    Equivalence of the Foulis-Holland Theorems and the Orthomodular Law in Quantum Logic: Part 1 Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The optimization of quantum computing circuitry and compilers at some level must be expressed in terms of quantum-mechanical behaviors and operations. In much the same way that the structure of conventional propositional (Boolean) logic (BL) is the logic of the description of the behavior of classical physical systems and is isomorphic to a Boolean algebra (BA), so also the algebra, C(H), of closed linear subspaces of (equivalently, the system of linear operators on (observables in)) a Hilbert space is a logic of the descriptions of the behavior of quantum mechanical systems and is a model of an ortholattice (OL). An OL can thus be thought of as a kind of “quantum logic” (QL). C(H) is also a model of an orthomodular lattice (OML), which is an ortholattice to which the orthomodular law has been conjoined. Now a QL can be thought of as a BL in which the distributive law does not hold. Under certain commutativity conditions, a QL does satisfy the distributive law; among the most well known of these relationships are the Foulis- Holland theorems (FHTs). Here I provide an automated deduction of one of the four FHTs from OML.

  • Chapter 22

    Equivalence of the Foulis-Holland Theorems and the Orthomodular Law in Quantum Logic: Part 2 Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The optimization of quantum computing circuitry and compilers at some level must be expressed in terms of quantum-mechanical behaviors and operations. In much the same way that the structure of conventional propositional (Boolean) logic (BL) is the logic of the description of the behavior of classical physical systems and is isomorphic to a Boolean algebra (BA), so also the algebra, C(H), of closed linear subspaces of (equivalently, the system of linear operators on (observables in)) a Hilbert space is a logic of the descriptions of the behavior of quantum mechanical systems and is a model of an ortholattice (OL). An OL can thus be thought of as a kind of “quantum logic” (QL). C(H) is also a model of an orthomodular lattice (OML), which is an ortholattice to which the orthomodular law has been conjoined. Now a QL can be thought of as a BL in which the distributive law does not hold. Under certain commutativity conditions, a QL does satisfy the distributive law; among the most well known of these relationships are the Foulis- Holland theorems (FHTs). Here I provide an automated deduction of one of the four FHTs from OML.

  • Chapter 23

    Equivalence of the Foulis-Holland Theorems and the Orthomodular Law in Quantum Logic: Part 3 Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The optimization of quantum computing circuitry and compilers at some level must be expressed in terms of
    quantum-mechanical behaviors and operations. In much the same way that the structure of conventional
    propositional (Boolean) logic (BL) is the logic of the description of the behavior of classical physical
    systems and is isomorphic to a Boolean algebra (BA), so also the algebra, C(H), of closed linear subspaces
    of (equivalently, the system of linear operators on (observables in)) a Hilbert space is a logic of the
    descriptions of the behavior of quantum mechanical systems and is a model of an ortholattice (OL). An
    OL can thus be thought of as a kind of “quantum logic” (QL). C(H) is also a model of an orthomodular
    lattice (OML), which is an ortholattice to which the orthomodular law has been conjoined. Now a QL can
    be thought of as a BL in which the distributive law does not hold. Under certain commutativity conditions,
    a QL does satisfy the distributive law; among the most well known of these relationships are the Foulis-
    Holland theorems (FHTs). Here I provide an automated deduction of one of the four FHTs from OML.

  • Chapter 24

    Equivalence of the Foulis-Holland Theorems and the Orthomodular Law in Quantum Logic: Part 4 Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The optimization of quantum computing circuitry and compilers at some level must be expressed in terms of
    quantum-mechanical behaviors and operations. In much the same way that the structure of conventional
    propositional (Boolean) logic (BL) is the logic of the description of the behavior of classical physical
    systems and is isomorphic to a Boolean algebra (BA), so also the algebra, C(H), of closed linear subspaces
    of (equivalently, the system of linear operators on (observables in)) a Hilbert space is a logic of the
    descriptions of the behavior of quantum mechanical systems and is a model of an ortholattice (OL). An
    OL can thus be thought of as a kind of “quantum logic” (QL). C(H) is also a model of an orthomodular
    lattice (OML), which is an ortholattice to which the orthomodular law has been conjoined. Now a QL can
    be thought of as a BL in which the distributive law does not hold. Under certain commutativity conditions,
    a QL does satisfy the distributive law; among the most well known of these relationships are the Foulis-
    Holland theorems (FHTs). Here I provide an automated deduction of one of the four FHTs from OML.

  • Chapter 25

    Equivalence of the Foulis-Holland Theorems and the Orthomodular Law in Quantum Logic: Part 5 Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The optimization of quantum computing circuitry and compilers at some level must be expressed in terms of
    quantum-mechanical behaviors and operations. In much the same way that the structure of conventional
    propositional (Boolean) logic (BL) is the logic of the description of the behavior of classical physical
    systems and is isomorphic to a Boolean algebra (BA), so also the algebra, C(H), of closed linear subspaces
    of (equivalently, the system of linear operators on (observables in)) a Hilbert space is a logic of the
    descriptions of the behavior of quantum mechanical systems and is a model of an ortholattice (OL). An
    OL can thus be thought of as a kind of “quantum logic” (QL). C(H) is also a model of an orthomodular
    lattice (OML), which is an ortholattice to which the orthomodular law has been conjoined. Now a QL can
    be thought of as a BL in which the distributive law does not hold. Under certain commutativity conditions,
    a QL does satisfy the distributive law; among the most well known of these relationships are the Foulis-
    Holland theorems (FHTs). Here I provide an automated deduction of the OMLaw, from OML without
    the OMLaw, conjoined with one of the FHTs.

  • Chapter 26

    Equivalence of the Foulis-Holland Theorems and the Orthomodular Law in Quantum Logic: Part 6 Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The optimization of quantum computing circuitry and compilers at some level must be expressed in terms of
    quantum-mechanical behaviors and operations. In much the same way that the structure of conventional
    propositional (Boolean) logic (BL) is the logic of the description of the behavior of classical physical
    systems and is isomorphic to a Boolean algebra (BA), so also the algebra, C(H), of closed linear subspaces
    of (equivalently, the system of linear operators on (observables in)) a Hilbert space is a logic of the
    descriptions of the behavior of quantum mechanical systems and is a model of an ortholattice (OL). An
    OL can thus be thought of as a kind of “quantum logic” (QL). C(H) is also a model of an orthomodular
    lattice (OML), which is an ortholattice to which the orthomodular law has been conjoined. Now a QL can
    be thought of as a BL in which the distributive law does not hold. Under certain commutativity conditions,
    a QL does satisfy the distributive law; among the most well known of these relationships are the Foulis-
    Holland theorems (FHTs). Here I provide an automated deduction of the OMLaw, from OML without
    the OMLaw, conjoined with one of the FHTs.

  • Chapter 27

    Equivalence of the Foulis-Holland Theorems and the Orthomodular Law in Quantum Logic: Part 7 Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    The optimization of quantum computing circuitry and compilers at some level must be expressed in terms of
    quantum-mechanical behaviors and operations. In much the same way that the structure of conventional
    propositional (Boolean) logic (BL) is the logic of the description of the behavior of classical physical
    systems and is isomorphic to a Boolean algebra (BA), so also the algebra, C(H), of closed linear subspaces
    of (equivalently, the system of linear operators on (observables in)) a Hilbert space is a logic of the
    descriptions of the behavior of quantum mechanical systems and is a model of an ortholattice (OL). An
    OL can thus be thought of as a kind of “quantum logic” (QL). C(H) is also a model of an orthomodular
    lattice (OML), which is an ortholattice to which the orthomodular law has been conjoined. Now a QL can
    be thought of as a BL in which the distributive law does not hold. Under certain commutativity conditions,
    a QL does satisfy the distributive law; among the most well known of these relationships are the Foulis-
    Holland theorems (FHTs). Here I provide an automated deduction of the OMLaw, from OML without
    the OMLaw, conjoined with one of the FHTs.

  • Chapter 28

    Improving Compression Performance with a Star Encoding Front End: A Linguistic Comparison Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    We introduce a front end encryption scheme to a conventional compression algorithm to improve its compression performance. We apply our technique on text to achieve better lossless compression rates with no significant runtime overhead. We extend our work to include different source languages, namely English, French, German, and Spanish to see the effect of source language on the overall performance. Our approach yields promising results on standard corpora for each language as it offers improved compression rate (with28.9% at most on Arithmetic Coding algorithm when the source language is English). Our scheme also promises to provide security, when the dictionar

  • Chapter 29

    Automated Semantics Treatment of Sequence Diagram Defining Grammar Rules Price 2.99  |  2.99 Rewards Points

    UML diagrams being graphical in nature have informal semantics and it is difficult to develop automated tools for conversion and transformation of the diagrams. Formal methods are proved to be effective for semantics analysis of software systems. However, usage of formal methods is not very welcomed at early stages of software development. Hence, linking UML and formal techniques is needed to address the deficiencies existing in both approaches. In this paper, an approach is developed for transformation of simple sequence diagram by defining grammar rules. Formal specification of the procedure is described using Z notation by capturing hidden semantics under the diagrams. The model is analyzed and validated using Z/Eves tool. We believe that resultant approach will be useful for developing automated tools for modeling and verification of software systems.

About the Author

Professor of Computer Science view complete profile

The University of Georgia (Tbilisi) · Physics Department. Spacial Department view complete profile

Ashu M. G. Solo is an independent interdisciplinary researcher and developer, electrical engineer, computer engineer, intelligent systems engineer, political and public policy engineer, mathematician, political writer, public policy analyst, political operative, entrepreneur, former infantry platoon commander understudy, and progressive activist. Solo has over 500 research and political commentary publications. view complete profile

Fernando G. Tinetti's most popular book is Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. view complete profile

Tags

Other Books by Author